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The Roots of Open-Book Management with Jack Stack and Jim Canfield

Mar 15, 2019 by Lauren Haley 1 Comment
Let's take it back a few years....14 years before the famous story of SRC's establishment in 1983. Jack Stack is learning the ins-and-outs of manufacturing, the detailed metrics involved in the industry, and receiving training and education provided by his company, International Harvester. But what he doesn't realize is that he's being cheated out of some of the most important metrics in any company: the financials and reporting system. In 1983, everyone is struggling for business, but this company is on the verge of failure. International Harvester owes $6 billion, interest rates are at 20%, and the company lays off  1000 workers weekly for two years straight. Jack and the other managers of the Springfield plant are fully focused on saving the jobs of their 119 employees and keeping the business from shutting down. This critical position allows Jack to take on the company financials himself and understand what it takes to make a great company: 
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Meet the Original Doubter of Open-Book Management

Mar 13, 2019 by Cassie Potts 0 Comments
Through the years, the team at SRC and The Great Game of Business have seen our share of doubters, disbelievers, critics and skeptics - everyone from CEOs, to managers, to hourly employees who said open-book management couldn't work... that teaching employees about business was crazy…that transparency was not necessary in business. Some of the biggest disbelievers came from right here at SRC…the birthplace of open-book management! One doubter with a particularly fascinating story is Denise Bredfeldt, a former transmission rebuilder at SRC during the early days of The Great Game of Business. To be fair, Denise lived through the dismal buyout of International Harvester; a time when trust and morale were at an all-time low. Before SRC was founded, Denise even circulated an underground newsletter mocking the company culture and management, and she wasn’t about to jump on the open-book bandwagon.
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From Apprehensive Doubter to Passionate Player

Mar 1, 2019 by Cassie Potts 0 Comments
Abby Fuqua had her doubts about open-book management when she was told  Venturity Finantial Partners, a Dallas accounting firm, would be implementing the Great Game of Business. "I thought it was corny. We've all got work to do, meetings to have, and I don't need another thing on my plate." But as their GGOB implementation started to unfold and Venturity started seeing substantial results, it became clear that the impact of the Great Game of Business would reach far beyond performance measures and financial results for the business. And that was exciting!
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The Management Style Every Millennial Should Know

Feb 5, 2019 by Steve Baker 0 Comments
Amy’s Ice Creams’ workforce is made up primarily of millennials, most of which are seasonal employees. In the short time these younger workers are with Amy's, this Great Game All-Star company maximizes engagement in order to make a lasting impact on employees' futures, as well as the success of the business. Take a look at what Marketing and Communications Director, Aaron Clay, has to say about the company's fun, fast-paced and positive Huddles combined with open-book management, and his four guidelines for enhancing engagement in your team's Huddles.
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The Great Game Growing in Springfield Social Sectors

Jan 21, 2019 by Great Game Team 0 Comments
“My business is unique. I’m not sure Great Game® will work here.” For-profit businesses of every size, shape, and industry have embraced the Great Game of Business over the past 35 years. Now, lessons learned by SRC have spread into the nonprofit and social sectors in a program called the Great Game for Social Sectors. In recent years, leading organizations such as Missouri Southern State University (MSSU), Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Ozarks (BBBSO) and Greene County, Missouri have embraced the open-book management principles taught by the Great Game as a way to improve their financial sustainability. Since the launch of the Great Game for Social Sectors in February 2017, 24 organizations have adopted the proven principles of the Great Game to transform their not-for-profit organizations.
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From $62K in Debt to a Business Worth $1.2M

At the Great Game of Business, we hope to not only transform businesses but also change the lives of the individual employees within those companies. Our goal is to transform the lives of 10 million people in the next 10 years. In this blog series, we are striving toward our 10-million-person goal by sharing stories of personal transformation resulting from the Great Game of Business and open-book management. Here, we feature Rob and Rachel Kelsey from King Maintenance Management in Springfield, Missouri, and how they brought the Great Game home to tackle their personal debts and reach their goal of starting their own business. 
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Remembering Herb Kelleher

Jan 4, 2019 by Jack Stack 2 Comments
I was saddened to hear about the loss of Herb Kelleher, the founder of Southwest Airlines. I’ll never forget the time back in the early 1990s when I was invited to Texas to talk about the Great Game of Business with Herb and his team at Southwest. After I gave my talk, I figured everything I had shared about our open-book story wasn’t worth much given how big Southwest was and how many locations they operated out of. I wasn’t sure our Great Game system would work in a big company. Then Herb stood up. He took over the podium and told his leaders that there were only five things that could take out their company: their five unions. I admit I was shocked because I didn’t know they were a union company. But Herb then told his team that the only way their airline was going to make it was if they could teach everyone, all ninety thousand people—including every union employee—how the company made money and generated cash.
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4 Common Mistakes with Open-Book Management

For more than 25 years, we’ve helped thousands of companies implement open-book management to its fullest capacity. Along the way, we’ve developed a list of common mistakes companies make while using transparency and open-book management in their organization. If you think you are not executing open-book management correctly, or are not seeing the results you expected, then you may be making one of these four common errors:
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35 Real Employees Share How GGOB Has Impacted Their Lives

At the Great Game of Business, results go beyond the financial numbers. Behind the numbers are stories and real individuals. We've asked actual, current employees from our 2018 All-Star companies what they had to say about how the Great Game has affected them personally. See the top comments below!
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Is Your Team Ready for Open-Books? Take This Leadership Quiz

Over 1,000 business books are published every month. Over 100 of those have ‘leadership’ in the title. It seems that we are always looking for new ways to lead in an ever-changing world of business. But has true leadership in the workplace ever really changed? Here’s another question to consider. Leadership in an open-book environment, how is it different?
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4 Reasons Your Employees Aren't on the Open-Book Bandwagon

Is your leadership team ready to make the leap into open-books, but the rest of your employees lagging behind? If you’re ready to start sharing financial and operational business information with your employees, but they’re just not ready to play along, there are probably some very logical –and common – reasons why. Here are the top four reasons that your employees haven’t jumped on the open-book management bandwagon.
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Anatomy of an All-Star Champion: Gravitas Impact Webinar with Rich Armstrong

You've heard about Great Game All-Stars, but what does the transformation of a company that achieves All-Star status actually look like? This Gravitas Impact webinar, the second half of a two-part series, features Rich Armstrong as he discusses the real-life case study of Great Game practitioner Practice Velocity, measurable results, detailed MiniGame™ examples and more with Gravitas Impact President, Keith Cupp. 
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About The Great Game of Business

Our approach to running a company was developed to help close one of the biggest gaps in business: the gap between managers and employees. We call our open-book approach The Great Game of Business. What lies at the heart of The Game is a very simple proposition: The best, most efficient, most profitable way to operate a business is to give everybody in the company a voice in saying how the company is run and a stake in the outcome. Let us teach you how to develop a culture of ownership, where employees think, act and feel like owners.