The Great Game of Business 800.386.2752

The Great Game of Business Blog

Sign up to receive our blog posts conveniently in your email box

3 Tips for Using Open-Book Management to Attract and Retain A Players

Jul 31, 2018 by Eric Rieger 0 Comments




Eric reiger blog-clear

 

Attracting and retaining top talent is the #1 challenge most businesses face in today's competitive marketplace.  Organizations that practice OBM (open-book management) have a major competitive edge that they should use to their advantage in all recruiting efforts.  

Here are 3 tips for leveraging your investment in open-book management to attract and retain A Players:

  1. Feature OBM in all your recruiting efforts- Having a chance to make a difference and be part of something bigger than oneself is often a motivating factor for job seekers. While compensation is always important, having the ability to impact the future results of an organization and then share in that success is a very attractive benefit.  You should be highlighting your OBM culture in every post, job ad and recruiting effort to maximize the exposure to potential employees.
  2. Make OBM part of your interviewing process- When you are going through your interview process for potential new employees, ask them what they know about open-book management and why it would be important for them to join an organization that practices it. This will eliminate any assumptions either party has and it will open doors to new lines of questions for the interview process. For candidates that are passionate about making a difference, OBM can increase appeal to A players. 
  3. Culture counts. Involve your team- We know that company culture is essential to draw in candidates, but we often forget that it’s just as important in weeding them out. Take time to share details about your company culture and involve as many people from your organization as is practical. You don’t just want candidates that have the appropriate experience, you want team players that are aligned with your company way and great employees that stay for the long haul. A Players know and attract other A Players.   Like Jack says, it’s pretty easy to stop one guy, but it’s pretty hard to stop 100!

Your people fuel your business, so finding the right fit should not be taken lightly. Make OBM the center of all your recruiting efforts and involve as many members of the team as possible.  People support what they help create, so get feedback as you create or modify positions within the company and recruit to fill them.  You’ll be well on your way to building that A Player team!

 


To learn more about using the Great Game of Business and OBM to Attract and Retain A Players, join Practitioner Eric Rieger at the 26th Annual Gathering of Games, where he will present an educational session on the topic. 

Learn More About The Gathering


 

Other Articles You Might Like:

 

Topics: Open-Book Management, Employee Recruitment and Retention

Written by Eric Rieger

Eric Rieger is the Founder and President of WEBIT Services, Inc., a technology services firm that provides Secure, Reliable and Efficient solutions for small to medium sized businesses in the Chicago-land area. Eric and his team have created a unique system of processes to manage technology which identify and eliminate costly reactive problems and focus on making technology a competitive advantage. Eric also is involved in public speaking on various technology and business topics of interest including Cyber Security and Open Book Management.

About The Great Game of Business

Our approach to running a company was developed to help close one of the biggest gaps in business: the gap between managers and employees. We call our open-book approach The Great Game of Business. What lies at the heart of The Game is a very simple proposition: The best, most efficient, most profitable way to operate a business is to give everybody in the company a voice in saying how the company is run and a stake in the outcome. Let us teach you how to develop a culture of ownership, where employees think, act and feel like owners.